Master of Letters in Organizational Leadership

Earn a Degree in Family Life Education or Organizational Leadership

Oxford Graduate School’s Master of Letters (M.Litt) program is designed for both career enhancement and entry into doctoral study.  The M.Litt program adheres to the underlying philosophy of education and learning methods of our doctoral program.  The degree requires a Program Orientation Workshop eleven courses for 32 semester hours.  Candidates for the M.Litt degree choose a curriculum track in Family Life Education (FLE) or Organizational Leadership (OL).

Applicants may transfer up to nine semester hours from an acceptable master’s program.  Applicants who have nearly enough college credit to graduate college without having received a Bachelor’s degree may also request an “Assessment of Prior Learning” to determine which deficiencies must be addressed to enter the Master’s program.

Applicants attend a Program Orientation Workshop (POW).  The orientation includes an introductin to the Oxford Graduate School program and overview of the subjects in the Family Life Education track and the Organizational Leadership track.  Completion time for a master’s degree is about 24 months. For students who have not been involved with formal education for several years, the courses are designed to provide comfortable reentry to the processes of formal learning.

Family Life Education

The Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum provides skills and knowledge to enrich individual and family life.  Students are trained to develop and deliver family-related services.  For information on how Family Life Education coursework applies toward the Certified Family Life Educator credential, please contact the National Council on Family Relations (888-781-9331) or www.ncfr.org.  Required courses of the FLE track are listed below in the sequence in which they are offered.  In addition to the 12 required courses, students may complete an optional internship in FLE.

[  ] – Indicates number of credit hours associated with each course.

FL 701 [3] Family Life Education Methodology—A study of the philosophy and principles of family life education and methods for planning, implementing, and evaluating activities to fulfill its goals; how to establish educational goals, select materials and activities, evaluate outcomes, and implement programs that are sensitive to community concerns and values and bring benefits appropriate to the community being served.

FL 702 [3] Sociology of the Family—A study of the origin and development of the family as a social institution and its variations of structure, function, and culture; the relationship of the family to the economic, political, religious, and educational institutions in American society; dating, courtship, marital choice, and work-family relationships; present and future demographic trends, gender roles, and culture-related influences affecting the nature of family living.

FL 703 [3] Family Resource Management—A study of the management of human and material resources designed to develop competence with and responsibility for goods and services available to a family in contemporary society; recognition of types of resources, processes for planning and implementing wise management; principles and skills for evaluating family resources, setting goals, decision-making, and implementing plans to fulfill the goals.  The course examines general principles and allows selective application to one’s own situation.

FL 704 [3] Human Sexuality—An overview of the basics of sexual physiology, development, behavior, values, human sexual response, dysfunction, sexual abuse and violence, family planning, variations of sexual behavior, theories of sexual orientation, and the role of a family life educator in sex education.

FL 705 [3] Parenting in a Religious Environment—An examination of theoretical approaches to teaching, guiding, and influencing children and adolescents; the efficacy of major theories when put into practice by contemporary parents; beliefs and practices globally and historically; adjustments of parental style associated with individual differences and life-cycle status; appropriate opportunity to apply learning to personally relevant situations.

FL 706 [3] Human Development: Birth to Adulthood—A study of physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral/spiritual, and personality factors as they influence development through the stages of prenatal, infancy, early and middle childhood, and adolescence; seminal theorists with alternate perspectives; and practical application for helping parents more effectively relate to and care for other family members.

FL 707 [3] Human Development: Aging and Elder Care—A study of physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral/spiritual, and personality factors as they influence development over the course of adult years, through the aging process, and death; the changing role of parents in relationship with adult children; the complex of factors confronting children when they provide care for aging parents.

FL 708 [3] Marital Counseling and Enrichment—A survey of marital counseling and enrichment theory and practice; contemporary trends in American culture; pre-marital counseling; crisis management and conflict management in marriage; marital distress and divorce; gender roles in the family; and family dynamics including the effects of the marital relationship on children.

FL 709 [3] Professional Ethics—An exploration of the issues, standards, and tensions that exist within professional ethics, personal morals, the social structure, and government; the ethical issues unique to or faced in common among professions; investigation of ethical issues within student’s own profession; the relationships and tensions among personal morals, belief systems, professional ethics, and the structures, norms, and laws of one’s own society.  (Concurrent with OL 708.)

FL 710 [3] Family Law and Public Policy—A study of how local, state, and federal law and public policy affect the family structure and way of life; an overview of the historical development of law and public policies related to families.

FL 720 [2] Capstone Project—Preparation of a project of original research applicable to one’s chosen vocational setting.  This is an opportunity  to apply learning from all previous courses to an actual need or dilemma encountered in the setting in which the student currently works or expects to work.  A student chooses among these forms:

(a) a critical review of literature built around a topic chosen by the student, (b) original research that examines a substantive issue within one’s vocational context, (c) creation of a training module relevant to and suitable for individuals who are in the student’s context of the degree field, or (d) a learning module at the Masters level that explicates a significant element within the degree’s curriculum.  Regardless of which option is chosen, the topic and its form must: (a) be approved by the professor in advance and (b) clearly and thoroughly include implications for Christianity both collectively and for individuals.   Prerequisites: Completion of all other requirements for the Masters degree.

OPTIONAL: FL 711 Internship—Forty-five clock hours of activity delivering family life education; must be preventive and growth-oriented rather than therapy, counseling, social work, early childhood education, etc.; supervised by a Certified Family Life Educator, if possible, or by an experienced professional who is working in any capacity that fits within family life education as broadly defined by the National Council on Family Relations; aims, conditions, and activities of the internship must be approved by faculty prior to the starting date.

Organizational Leadership

The Organizational Leadership (OL) curriculum builds upon principles of human behavior found in organizations large and small, public and private, regimented and volunteer, and profit-making and social service.  The curriculum examines organizational systems and structures with emphasis upon interpersonal dynamics, ethics, and social costs and benefits.

The purpose is to equip graduates to implement qualities of effective leadership in an organization.  The program is designed to improve the work of persons at every level of organizational participation, including entry-level employees, CEOs, board members, consultants, and educators.  Required courses of the OL track are listed below in the sequence in which they are offered.  In addition to the 10 required courses, students may complete an optional practicum.

Course Descriptions   

[  ] – Indicates number of credit hours associated with each course.

OL 701 [3] Foundations of Human Behavior—A survey of major theories of human behavior; concepts and definitions held by several philosophical and psychological schools; history, research evidence, and implications for contemporary organizational life and issues within contemporary global society.

OL 702 [3] Theories of Organizational Behavior—An examination of leadership, power, authority, problem resolution, and the impact of organizational structure in relation to management style of educational, religious, business, and governmental institutions.

OL 703 [3] Transformational Leadership —A colloquium which considers the formal and informal aspects of administration and organization with emphasis on life-cycle leadership and application to the structure, processes, and behavior of organized groups.

OL 704 [3] Human Relation Skills in a Pluralistic Society- An understanding of human relations skills for effective interpersonal communciation; examination of cultural and values differences among ethnic, racial, religious, and other social groups; generic application for professionals in educational, community, family, work, and leisure settings.

OL 705 [3] Communication Skills and Assertiveness—An examination of communication theories and skills, psycholinguistic principles, and theories and strategies of active in-depth dialogue and assertiveness training; interactive skills assessment and development; includes goal setting, role playing, alternative behavior, evaluating consequences, and implementation of assertive behavior.

OL 706 [3] Fundraising in Nonprofit Organizations – A focus on the crucial aspects (theological, philosophical, ethical, transformational, strategic, and pragmatic) for developing organizational leaders who are capable of leading others to mature stewardship and a giving lifestyle and equip these leaders with the knowledge, tools, and skills that will enable them to identify and secure predictable financial resources for their ministry/organizations.

OL 707 [3] Mentoring and Coaching—How management of volunteers differs from supervision of paid staff, motivations for volunteering, recruitment, common mistakes in recruitment and management, troublesome personality types, “normal” retention, how to increase retention, meaningful reward and recognition.

OL 708 [3] Professional Ethics—An exploration of the issues, standards, and tensions that exist within professional ethics, personal morals, the social structure, and government; the ethical issues unique to or faced in common among professions; investigation of ethical issues within student’s own profession; the relationships and tensions among personal morals, belief systems, professional ethics, and the structures, norms, and laws of one’s own society.  (Concurrent with FL 709.)

OL 709 [3] Business Law—A study of case problems relating to the application of laws concerning contract, agency, property, and business and institutional organizations.

OL 720 [2] Capstone Project—Preparation of a project of original research applicable to one’s chosen vocational setting.  This is an opportunity  to apply learning from all previous courses to an actual need or dilemma encountered in the setting in which the student currently works or expects to work.  The students may choose among these forms (a) a critical review of literature built around a topic chosen by the student, (b) original research that examines a substantive issue within one’s vocational context, (c) a training module relevant to and suitable for individuals who are in the context of the degree field, or (d) a learning module at the Masters level that explicates a significant element within the degree’s curriculum.  Regardless of which option is chosen, (a) the topic and its form must be approved by the professor in advance and (b) the final report must clearly and thoroughly include implications for Christianity both collectively and for individuals.   Prerequisites: Completion of all other requirements for the Masters degree.

OPTIONAL: OL 711 Practicum in Selected Field of Study—A research practicum conducted under the supervision of a faculty advisor and according to a student-prepared and faculty-approved proposal; evaluation by an employer and the faculty advisor.

M.Litt Curriculum
Family Life Education Organizational Leadership
Core A FL 701 (3) Family Life Education & Methodology OL 701 (3) Foundations of Human Behavior
FL 702 (3) Sociology of the Family OL 702 (3) Theories – Organizational Behavior
FL 703 (3) Family Resource Management OL 703 (3) Transformational Leadership
Core B FL 704 (3) Human Sexuality OL 704 (3) Human Relationship Skills in a Pluralistic Society
FL 705 (3) Parent Education & Guidance in a Religious Environment OL 705 (3) Communication Skills and Conflict
FL 706 (3) Human Development (Birth-Adult) OL 706 (3) Fundraising in Nonprofit Organization
FL 707 (3) Human Development(Aging-Elder) OL 707 (3) Mentoring and Coaching
Core C FL 708 (3) Marital Counseling & Enrichment OL 708 (3) Professional Ethics
FL 709 (3) Professional Ethics OL 709 (3) Business Law
FL 710 (3) Family Law & Public Policy OL 710 (3) Principles of Sociological Research
FL 720 (2) Capstone Project OL 720 (2) Capstone Project
TBA FL 711 (2) Internship (Optional) OL 711 (2) Practicum (Optional)
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